Worried about time? Analysis? So is your neighbor.

You made it to Biology II, and you’ve realized it’s a completely different course than Biology I. Uh oh.

I asked all of my Principles of Biology II students this semester to share “Any concerns that you have about the class” after the first day. Here’s a peek at what y’all said, and some help! (I’ll update this later this week after lab students finish the orientation)

General worries…

  • Staying organized / Managing my time / Due dates – Find someone to help you be accountable. Meet, text, or email each other when you’re supposed to be reading the book/your notes. “This chapter’s killing me… are you doing any better?” Do you need music in the background while you study?
  • A lot of information / Multiple chapters per week – Review vocabulary terms & section headings first. Skim the chapter, looking for unfamiliar ideas. Mark those sections for extra time, and take notes about what you don’t understand. Don’t highlight everything.
  • Keeping up with notes during lecture – Focus on added explanations that I mention in class. Don’t try to write down every word – outline & use short notes – especially if it’s already on the slide (I post them on the course website). Many students print them or add typed notes on the digital pdf itself. This is definitely how I went through organic chemistry!
  • I’m not a science major / Missed the first week / Took biology I elsewhere / Struggled with biology I – Ask questions, and don’t panic. Use the course website to keep an eye on your grades. Ask for help early: Office hours (free…), STEM tutoring (free), making friends (okay, you might buy them lunch sometimes). I also post extra videos and activities that will give you another run through of many of the crucial topics, both for Biology I and II.
  • Study skills – Focus on understanding the concept, then fit the terminology into the broader story. Use active studying techniques – quiz yourself, write out answers to end-of-chapter questions, explain things to study partners out loud. Don’t make the mistake of thinking that re-reading your notes / chapter / flash cards is going to be the most effective use of your time.

Information worries…

  • Making the best grade that I can / Making an A – Shoot for the stars, and at least you’ll land on the moon. Read the study guides along with the textbook chapter when possible, so that you know what the most important topics will be. Find out why/how you answered wrong when it happens. Always aim for that A, and back up that ambition with solid, productive work.
  • The comprehensive final exam – Study Guides will be posted on D2L throughout the semester. Come to office hours and review exams I-IV after they are graded so that you understand why/how/when you chose the incorrect answers.
  • This class will be challenging – Certainly, but there is a bit less memorization than Biology I. The broader topics (evolution) are more intuitive to understand, though the taxonomy will require you to do the most memorization. Focus on understanding the concept, then fit the terminology into the broader story.  This class is designed to prepare you for amazing upper level courses – such as parasitology, ecology, & macroevolution. I also post extra videos and activities that will give you another run through of many of the crucial topics, both for Biology I and II.
  • I need to apply the information and think critically / How does this connect to everyday life – This is true in all of your courses, honestly. Stop and reflect on the WHY, HOW, and WHAT of the topic. You already use many of the concepts as part of how you adapt your decisions on a daily basis. Natural selection? Ecology? It’s all costs vs. benefits in a world of limited resources. You can often start by putting yourself “in the organism’s shoes,” but don’t take it too far. Many species do not have the same level of memory and self-awareness that humans do, and respond on a much more instinctual level.
    • Use logic to think through the possibilities.
    • Avoid falling into the teleological trap of thinking about what an organism “wants” based on your own ideas as a human.
    • Set aside belief. This is not a course on religion, opinion, or anthropology. Science is the search for truth about how the world works.

It helps to remember that you’re all in this boat together, even if your seats (your lives/backgrounds) are different!


Featured image: Science scarf and epic purple shirt – cool things from my mother-in-law and mom, both of whom love that I’m a college professor.

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Nervous? Excited? So is your neighbor.

From freshman to returning grandmother, everyone has to go through that first day of a new class.

I asked my Principles of Biology I students this semester to share “Any concerns that you have about the class” after the first day. Here’s a peek at what y’all said, and some help!

General worries…

  • Finding the textbook – Armstrong bookstore, the textbook broker across from campus, Amazon.com, Chegg.com, Half.ebay.com … Just remember, you’ll need this book again for Biology II. Renting might not actually be the best option.
  • Staying organized / Managing my time – Find someone to help you be accountable. Meet, text, or email each other when you’re supposed to be reading the book/your notes. “This chapter’s killing me… are you doing any better?”
  • Keeping up with notes during lecture – Focus on added explanations that I mention in class. Don’t try to write down every word – outline & use short notes – especially if it’s already on the slide (I post them on the course website for you!).
  • Not sure what/how to read effectively – Don’t highlight everything. Skim the chapter first, looking for unfamiliar ideas. Mark those sections for extra time, and take notes about what you don’t understand.
  • It is a really big class – Well, you have the option to either stand out or blend in, but anyone is welcome to ask questions. There are also more options for who to study with! Also, my office is 50% less intimidating than most professors’ offices. Come by during office hours and ask for help.
  • Memorization – Know the story, memorize the details. Biology is always integrated, so make sure you can put the pieces together. Example: Facts – electrons are negatively charged. The valence shell is involved with bonding. Story – sharing & stealing electrons is the basis for constructing molecules, and the valence structure tells you how an element will bond.
  • This is my first college class / I have first year jitters… / It’s been 10 years since I was in school – Ask questions, and don’t panic. Use D2L/E-classroom to keep an eye on your grades. Ask for help early: Office hours (free…), STEM tutoring (free), Supplemental Instructors (free), making friends (okay, you might buy them lunch sometimes).

Information worries…

  • Making the best grade that I can / Making an A – Shoot for the stars, and at least you’ll land on the moon. Read the study guides along with the textbook chapter, so that you know what the most important topics will be. Always aim for that A, and back up that ambition with solid, productive work.
  • I might not catch on as fast as other students – Positive thinking + Positive action = Positive results. Reality check might be that you need to ask for help: Office hours (free…), STEM tutoring (free), Supplemental Instructors (free), making friends (okay, you might buy them lunch sometimes).
  • Not learning as quickly as I did in high school – Find out how you learn. Does it help if you draw everything? Do you need music in the background while you study? Take notes in class. Answer the questions at the end of the chapter – I’m not going to assign them like your teacher used to, but it will help you learn if you do them.
  • Have I forgotten my high school biology? – Maybe so, but don’t panic. Khan academy might be helpful, or CrashCourse. I post extra videos and activities that will give you another run through of many of the crucial topics. Send me an email or stop by during office hours.
  • Worried about the topics that I struggled with last time – Don’t psych yourself out, psych yourself up! You are going to knock them out of the park this time, because you are planning ahead, asking for help, and working hard. Remember to still study for the topics that you understood well, as it’s easy to forget the basics. What’s the mitochondrion do again?
  • This class will be a lot of work / will be difficult – Maybe so, but you can plan ahead. Do the assignments, be prepared, and find out why/how you answered wrong when it happens. This class is designed to prepare you for amazing upper level courses – such as parasitology, applied microbiology, environmental chemistry…
  • The comprehensive final exam – Study Guides on D2L are already posted! Come to office hours and review exams I-IV after they are graded so that you understand why/how/when you chose the incorrect answers.

It helps to remember that you’re all in this boat together, even if your seats (your lives/backgrounds) are different!


Featured image: Science scarf and epic purple shirt – cool things from my mother-in-law and mom, both of whom love that I’m a college professor.

The Artist

Being an artist can mean many different things.

For me, being an artist means that I draw, paint, play several musical instruments, photograph weird things, and occasionally sculpt clay, wood, metal, and leather. Although I actually did take university courses in drawing and sculpture at Dartmouth and in high school, much of what I know comes from self-study and working in the Claflin Jewelry Studio while I was a student.

Am I a great artist? Nope, but I’m not bad. I enjoy spending a lot of time on a piece, so that dedication usually shows through in the final product. Short, quick things are a bane, though. Why? Because I don’t draw/paint/sculpt often enough. I don’t practice flute regularly, and haven’t set a regular schedule for learning harp yet.

Even though I may not produce much art in any form, part of what I enjoy most about being an artist is being able to truly appreciate and be inspired by the work of others. To be capable of looking at someone’s painting and work out how they might have planned and executed the work, or to understand how impressive a musical performance is (or isn’t). I’m often inspired by history (Hello, Society for Creative Anachronism!) and fictional characters and places, in addition to the constant inspiration that is provided by the natural world. When I do create something worth sharing, I usually post it on DeviantArt, but I don’t photo-dump on there like some people tend to. It takes a pretty impressive or well-planned shot for me to put it on DeviantArt.

harper_unfinished_by_myrddinderwydd

The Harper, Deth

Deth from Riddle of Stars by Patricia Mckillip
Drawn in high school, based on an illustration in the edition of the book that our library had. Never really finished.

machuginn_s_feather_darts_by_myrddinderwydd-dawyz05

MacHuginn’s Feather Darts

A sketch during a Dungeons and Dragons session last year – my character MacHuginn (one of the characters in Divergent Paths) commissioned a smith in ?? to make him a few dozen metal-tipped darts out of his feathers. He also uses them for making his own quills!

leather_bracer_finished_by_myrddinderwydd-d9kx95v

My leather archery bracer, tooled leather.

Cameron taught me leatherworking last year, and I made a bracer so that I’d tear up my arm less while shooting. Since I have an Irish persona in the SCA and love Celtic knotwork, I ended up with this painstakingly time consuming piece!

claddagh_ring_by_myrddinderwydd

Claddagh ring, cast in silver. Terrible photo…

Much of my earlier work I don’t have photos of, since camera phones weren’t as common then and I wasn’t as interested in photography either. This Claddagh ring was carved in wax by hand, then molded and cast in silver in the Claflin Jewelry Studio at Dartmouth. Unfortunately, Cameron lost it several years ago… So no luck on taking a better photo.

I can take good photos though! These are from our road trip out west in July 2016. We had the Nikon 5300 with us, and had a great time visiting family and roaming around in parks, reservations, and fishing.


featured image: Raven ring, another Dungeons and Dragons sketch for MacHuginn (2016)

How to “Do well in class”

Students ask this question often, especially when they are taking a class in an unfamiliar subject, or when they have existing anxiety about the topic from previous experiences (of their own or from classmates).

It isn’t a bad question to ask! It shows that you are thinking about making a Plan for Success. In response, expect to hear 1st: some of the tried-and-true recommendations that you might already know, and 2nd: advice specific to that class/professor/subject.

Tried-and-True

  1. Have a growth mindset! Dedicate yourself to improvement and success, instead of reinforcing old prejudices about your skills. Positive thinking + Positive actions = Positive results.
  2. Take notes in class. Write down more than what is written on the slide instead of thinking that you can look back at the slides and remember everything the professor said.
  3. Come by office hours with your questions or set up a meeting with your professor. [See video below]
  4. Be engaged in class. Not everyone is outspoken, but you should all be willing to challenge your classmates’ comments, guess, or give your opinion when the professor opens the floor during class. You’ll remember more by being engaged with the material instead of passively listening.
  5. Do the review/practice exercises in the book. Think about them, and don’t just look up the answer online.

Science Focused

  1. Use your critical thinking skills! Many science courses are not about memorizing a lot of facts, even though you will be learning a lot of new terminology as well. The most challenging questions on exams will often require you to demonstrate that you can apply what you have learned.
  2. Find out how/why we know. Science is a process of understanding the world, so successful science students need to understand this methodology for inquiring about processes over the course of scientific investigations. Sometimes these answers will be the focus of more advanced courses than you are currently in, but asking the questions puts you in the right frame of mind.
  3. Make connections between old and new facts, as well as the processes linking them together. Few things occur in a vacuum, which means that interactions and changes are a normal part of our dynamic environment. Everything is connected!
  4. Be open-minded about new ideas. You don’t learn anything by refusing to consider facts that contradict your current beliefs & ideas about the world. Every single idea was new at one time.
  5. Understand the value of “I don’t know.” Why do we conduct experiments? Because we don’t know what results we will get. So why would you think that admitting you don’t know is a problem?

featured image: a giant bee in Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge, Socorro, NM (July 2016)

Idiotic Intelligence

This year I’ve been part of a faculty Reading Round Table that is studying a book by digital education guru James Paul Gee – The Anti-education Era.

One epic quote in the preface grabbed my attention immediately, and I knew that this was going to be an interesting book.

After many years of studying people I have become intrigued, as have many others, by how a species named for its intelligence (Homo sapiens: wise or knowing man) can sometimes be so stupid. Depending on how you look at it, humans are either marvelously intelligent or amazingly stupid.
– Preface, pg I

Gee’s point here is about the ways in which people can use fabulously helpful information and incredibly sophisticated tools in ways that are ultimately destructive.

Knowledge in itself is neither good nor bad – it is the way in which we use our knowledge that is consequential.


featured image: The Rocky Mountains near Denver, CO (July 2016)

Exercise your mind – Criticise!

Use your mental muscles every time you consider a decision or read an article.

Impress your friends, professors, and supervisors with your ability to analyze a situation instead of simply reacting and/or following someone else’s directions.

Image not showing?
Go to the Source: National Geographic Press


featured image: Autumn in Georgia, Armstrong State University (Fall 2016)