Professors Disappear at the end of the Semester.

Well, at least I do. It’s been a very busy past 2 months, and I’ve been busy even amongst the grading and teaching too. What have I been doing? Earth Day March for Science, visiting family, cheering on spring blossoms.

Being science-y.

And being nerd-y. How? Dungeons and Dragons, of course. Can’t go wrong with the classics. My current character is a Norse skald (bard) from ~800 CE, and we somehow managed to sail from Midgard to Vanaheim – magic is much cooler there, but there are were-beasts, and two moons. I’ve been playing a lot of Dragon Age: Inquisition and Origins, especially since I turned in final grades. Solas and Blackwall are two of my favorite characters, and I’ve started writing a Solas + Inquisitor fan-fiction “A Long Hunt” to show my love for it. Later chapters of the fanfic will definitely be NSFW.

Being nerd-y

What am I up to next? I’m teaching future K-5 teachers how to “Do Science” in the course Earth and Life Science for Early Childhood Education Majors, so I’m preparing materials for starting June 5th.

“A Chemist Looks at Parasitology”

Featuring: A pair of bioillustration pieces that I’m fairly proud of.
Looking back, I wish that I had already had the phenomemal photos that we later took of the parasites, so that I could have rendered them in more detail – perhaps someday I’ll go back and make an updated version of these.
Probopyrus pandalicola and Palaemonetes pugio

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Meet the love of my M.S. in Marine Sciences life…


 

I was introduced to the quirky poem “A Chemist Looks at Parasitology” at the 2015 meeting of the American Society of Parasitologists in New Orleans, Louisiana.

Yes, these micro-sized monsters seem like science fiction – Why? – Because these are the real creatures that inspired amazing science fiction stories in the first place!

A Chemist Looks at Parasitology

Parasitology! Parasitology!
One part of science to two of mythology,
Oodles of doodles that you will insist
Are micro-sized monsters that just can’t exist,
Papers replete with long names in italics
Describing in jargon the fanciful antics
Of creatures who live on the fat of the land
In host after host without lifting a hand.
Parasitology! Queen of biology!
One part of science to two of mythology.
Don’t you owe nature a humble apology?

The Journal of Parasitology, Vol. 58, No. 4, August 1972, p. 698
-Composed by A. E. R. Westman, and read at a dinner honoring the retirement of Dr. A. M. Fallis, on 31 May 1972, Toronto, Canada.


featured image: A grass shrimp (Palaemonetes pugio)

The Artist

For starters, all of the images you see on this site are mine.
Photos, drawings, paintings, digital media etc. Take a look on my DeviantArt page for examples of most of these. I used to work in the Claflin Jewelry Studio at Dartmouth College, which is where I learned my metalworking skills, and I also took some of the studio art classes while I was a student there. There are very few photos of any of my work from then, and most of it I gave away to friends and family. Needless to say, I don’t have the tools to do too much metalworking or pottery anymore, though I plan to at some point.

Most of my (minimal) skills with a camera are actually from working on my M.S. in Marine Sciences at Savannah State University. Besides photographing trips out to sea on the RV Savannah, I also used photography to enhance my publications and to create an epic video of parasites being spewed out of a shrimp…I’ve never wondered why I mix science and art, that’s for sure.

Traditional Art
Pencil & Staedtler markers
Acrylics for most painting
Gouache & pencil for medieval scrolls
Calligraphy: Speedball inks & nibs on Bristol board
Leatherwork
Pyrography
Metalworking
Pottery & sculpture

Photography/Videography Tools
Nikon D5300 DSLR camera with various lenses for macrophotography
GIMP photo editing studio
Windows 10
Droid Turbo 2 cellphone
BLIPS Smart Micro Optics lenses

featured image: Standing Stones

First blog post…

Well, all I have to say is that this should be interesting.
I am pulled in many different directions and find that I spend a lot of time in self-reflection and exploration, in addition to pressing forward in my professional career as a scientist. Sometimes it’s a challenge, but I think that the internal conflict ultimately makes me a stronger person. Who knows if anyone will ever read these, but if it helps me think then it’s worth the effort.

-B

featured image: near the bridge at Sweetwater Creek State Park, Lithia Springs, GA (November 2016)